End of season- swishing success in Lewisham

Following the success of our ‘big swish’ held in Lewisham shopping centre last year, we decided to hold three more mini ‘swishes’ in the borough at – Brockley, Grove Park and Lee Green.

Swishing is swapping – people turn up with something (in this case clothing) that they no longer want and swap with other peoples clothes that they no longer want. No money changes hands and swishes are usually a sociable event with the added benefit of reducing the need to shop and reusing clothing.

The three mini swishes were held each month from January to March with thirty residents coming along to swish items of clothing. In total twenty six items of clothing were swished and other items of clothing were handed in which we sent for reuse.

Window dressing at the swishing event

Window dressing at the swishing event

The swish in March took place at Lee Green Community Centre- whilst the sewing lesson was taking place upstairs!

Feedback about the events was very positive: “Thank you, some lovely new clothes and a fab dress for tomorrow night” & “Nice relaxed event”

Another satisfied customer

Another satisfied customer - vintage dress going to a happy swisher

We haven’t currently got any more swishes planned however you can go to http://www.swishing.com which advertise local events. If you don’t want to swish your clothes, you can always donate them to a charity shop or take them to one of our textile banks which are located across the borough. Click on the following link and find the nearest textile bank to where you live: http://www.lewisham.gov.uk/myservices/wasterecycle/other-waste-and-recycling/Pages/Textile-recycling.aspx

We take the MetalMatters Campaign directly to the shoppers

On Friday 14th March, members of the Council’s recycling team launched it’s MetalMatters campaign at the shopping centre in Lewisham. The campaign aims to raise awareness of the importance of recycling tins, cans, aerosols and foil and increase the tonnages collected in the borough.

Lewisham Council have received funding from MetalMatters and also from the Waste Resources Action Programme (WRAP) to conduct a campaign right across the borough. For the launch, we joined up with Myatt Garden Primary School who came along to the shopping centre to create an original piece of artwork using tins, cans, foil and bottles tops.

Myatt Garden Primary Schools made a good start on the art work will will go to other schools in Lewisham.

Myatt Garden Primary School made a good start on the art work which will go to other schools in Lewisham.

Their canvass for this event was a huge framed steel sheet which with the aid of magnets was used to place bottle tops and recycled cans to form images and words. 10 children spent 4 hours in the main square of the shopping centre preparing bits of metal, magnetic strips, cuttings and placing them onto the steel sheet.

Their infectious enthusiasm led many passing shoppers to stop and enquire what the activity was all about. This gave the recycling team the perfect opportunity to engage with the shoppers and to explain the importance of recycling tins and cans and let them know how much metal really matters.

Children from Myatt Garden Primary School, teachers, representatives from the MetalMatters campaign and WRAP and special guest the Tin Man.

Children from Myatt Garden Primary School, teachers, representatives from the MetalMatters campaign and WRAP and special guest the Tin Man.

This was also an opportunity to ask all those residents to recycle all their paper, cardboard, glass bottles and jars, beverage cartons, mixed plastics and plastic bottles including their tops.

The event was a huge success with all the school children having a great day out and making their own personal contribution to public art. The artwork will go on to visit more schools in the borough and may eventually appear in the National Gallery.

Shoppers also had a chance to meet our mystery guest the Tin Man who really was in a position to say how much metal really does matter. Lots of shoppers stopped to pose for photos with him and he was more than happy to pose with all the school children in group shots.

For the next couple of months residents will continue to see the campaign on the side of our recycling and refuse vehicles and will also be receiving a second leaflet through the post reminding them of the importance of recycling tins, cans, aerosols and foil.

Don't forget to recycle all your tins, cans, aerosols and foil and make your metal matter.

Don’t forget to recycle all your tins, cans, aerosols and foil and make your metal matter.

One thing we would also ask everyone to do and that is to give your food cans a quick rinse before depositing them into your recycling bin. This will increase their value and stop your bin from smelling. For more information on what you can recycle or if you want to order a recycling bins, please click on the following link: http://www.lewisham.gov.uk/myservices/wasterecycle/Pages/default.aspx?LGNTF=10

Going bananas and getting creative for Fairtrade Fortnight!

Bananas are a hot topic as this years Fairtrade Fortnight (24th February to 9th March) centered around the campaign to make bananas fair. Lewisham got into the swing of things with a number of events throughout the fortnight including a supper at the Catford Canteen, discussions by banana farmers at both Goldsmiths University and the Horniman Museum. Lewisham schools also got on board with Kilmorie school hosting a Banana themed Fairtrade breakfast and cake sale and the boroughs Clean & Green schools took part in a Fairtrade poster competition.
Insert picture of Horniman event

A Fairtrade banana tells people about the plight of the banana farmers at at Horniman Park.

A Fairtrade banana tells people about the plight of the banana farmers at Horniman Park.

Prices for bananas has been driven lower because of a price war from supermarkets to entice shoppers by offering the fruit cheaply. The effect of this has been to push the price paid to the banana producers to 40% less over the last ten years at a time when the cost of producing bananas has increased. This not only has a detrimental effect on the wages and working conditions for farmers but encourages them to intensify banana production. Environmental problems such as soil exhaustion and increased water use also have the potential to effect the land.

Leona Garrick of St Winifreds Catholic Infant School with teacher Mrs Abbs and Councillor Susan Wise

Leona Garrick of St Winifreds Catholic Infant School with teacher Mrs Abbs and Councillor Susan Wise

Leona Garrick produced this years winning poster design which will be seen out and about in the borough on one of our recycling vehicles! For more information about Fairtrade, please visit: http://www.lewisham.gov.uk/myservices/business/Pages/Fairtrade.aspx

Can we do it? Yes we Can

Lewisham’s Metal Matters campaign has been running for a couple of weeks now and many of you may already have seen this in one form or another. Perhaps you have seen the trucks carrying the huge banners highlighting the importance of recycling tins and cans for example or have seen the JC Decaux signs carrying the posters all across Lewisham. The Council’s official website has also been displaying a huge banner ad with a link connecting you to our recycling page.

JC Decaux signs as seen all across the borough

JC Decaux signs as seen all across the borough

The metal packaging manufacturing industry, recyclers and fillers have teamed up with Lewisham Council to launch the ‘make your metals matter’ recycling campaign, to raise awareness of the importance of metal packaging recycling and to increase the amount collected from households. The campaign is being jointly funded by MetalMatters, an industry partnership comprising the UK’s leading producers, users and recyclers of metal packaging and Recycle for London.

To raise awareness further, we are going to have a launch event in the Lewisham Shopping on Friday 14th March between 10am – 2pm.

The event will be our opportunity to engage with Lewisham shoppers and encourage them further to recycle all their tins and cans including aerosols and foil. Also at the event will be children from Myatt Garden Primary School who will be taking part in an art project to create a unique piece of artwork from tins, cans, bottle tops and ring pulls. The construction of the art project will be taking place in the shopping centre itself and council staff will also be there asking shoppers to join in should they wish.

It is hoped that once the artwork is completed, it will go on to be displayed in the National Gallery. As well as all this activity, we will also be inviting a special guest that will be handing leaflets and talking to shoppers about his own experiences of how much metal matters to him.

If you are going to be in the shopping centre on March 14th between 10am and 2pm, why not pop over to the Metal Matters stand and say hello and find out how you can play your part in increasing the amount of tins, cans, aerosols and foil that can be recycled.

Further information about the recycling of tins, cans, paper, cardboard, mixed plastics, plastic bottles, glass bottles and jars, beverage cartons can be found on the following link: http://www.lewisham.gov.uk/myservices/wasterecycle/Pages/What-can-I-put-in-my-recycling-bin.aspx

Getting creative with the Peoples Patchwork project!

Late last year, the recycling team were approached by colleagues in the library service who told us about a project they were running and wondered if we could help to source some materials for it.

The project called the ‘Peoples Patchwork’ has the aim of making a large patchwork quilt out of individual patches designed by the people of Lewisham. Each patch should tell a story of the person or group that made it, exploring what Lewisham means to them. When the quilt is complete, it will be exhibited at Peoples Day and later, displayed around the borough.

The contribution made by the environment division at Lewisham Council.

The contribution made by the environment division at Lewisham Council (thanks to Sarah Foraud).

Working with our new textile contractor- LMB, we had just installed new textile banks across the borough and we thought it was a perfect opportunity to not only try and source some fabric squares to donate to the project, but also make one ourselves to be included in the final quilt!

We were given guidance on the size we needed to make the fabric patch so that it could be included- the design being 15cm x 15cm with at least a 1.5cm all the way around (so total size 18cm squared). Any medium can be used for the design on the fabric, including appliqué, embroidery etc but we chose fabric paint and we created a design close to our hearts- clothing/textile re-use. So with instructions in hand, a member of staff took the fabric swatch home and over a rainy weekend at the end of January and produced the patch shown below!

There is still time to take part in the project if you feel like getting creative! The library service are running drop in sessions where you can go along and create your patch, full details here: http://www.lewisham.gov.uk/inmyarea/events/whats-on/peoples-day/Pages/Peoples-Patchwork.aspx

Metal really does matter

Today see’s the start of a brand new recycling campaign in the borough called Metal Matters which aims to drive up the recycling tonnages of tins and cans and prove that metal really does matter.

Many residents may have already seen the new livery on the refuse and recycling trucks promoting the campaign (see images below). As well as all the livery on the trucks, JC Decaux signs will be appearing all across the borough and will be carrying the same images and messages.

Your cans could end up as an iPod, an iron or a kettle?

Your cans could end up as an iPod, an iron or a kettle?

The message is a simple one; please use your recycling bins to recycle all of the tins and cans that you use including aerosols. This includes steel food cans that beans and soups normally come in right through to soft drink and beer cans. Many people may not be aware that tins and cans can be recycled or may think that just certain types of cans are acceptable which isn’t the case.

Details of the types of cans and more information about the campaign will be arriving through your door with the latest edition of Lewisham Life. The leaflet demonstrates the versatility of steel and aluminium and shows some of the products that these items are made into.

Where does it all go?

Where does it all go?

Did you know for example that the aluminium drink can is the most recycled drinks container on the planet? And also that every minute of every day, an average of 113,200 aluminium cans are recycled.

So, why do we want you to recycle tins and cans? For one thing, recycling steel and aluminium cans helps to reduce waste. As well as that, it also saves energy, conserves natural resources, and cuts down on the amount of waste that goes to incineration.

So what are we asking you to do? The next time your are out shopping and buying cans of food or drinks in aluminium or steel cans, please think about putting the empty can into your recycling bin when you have finished with them. If the cans have some residue of food in them, then please give them a quick rinse before putting them into your recycling bin. This will improve the quality of the recycling and also stop your bin from smelling.

Wanted: All your steel and aluminium cans

Wanted: All your steel and aluminium cans

Members of the recycling team will be in Lewisham Shopping Centre on March 14th between 10am and 2pm talking to shoppers about the recycling of tins and cans in a bid to drive up the recycling rates of this material. If you have any questions or queries about the recycling of tins and cans or if you want  to ask a question about recycling generally, please come over and say hello.

We are hoping to work with a school to create some kind of sculpture on the day made from tins and cans which sounds very interesting and there may also be a special guest turning up? Hope to see you there.

Service Standards – A thank you to residents

If you haven’t seen them already, then next time you hear a refuse or recycling vehicle coming down your street, have a look out the window at the new livery on the sides of the trucks.

We'll only collect side waste if it's for recycling and it presented correctly.

Thank you – for bagging your extra recycling.

Most of the borough should now be familiar with the new Service Standards that we have been rolling out since July 2013. Many of our new trucks are also being used to to carry those Service Standards messages and more importantly to say thank you to all those people that have helped to make the transition an easy one.

The Service Standards have been brought in to bring Lewisham’s refuse and recycling services in line with what most London boroughs and council’s nationwide are doing with regard to their collections.

They are also being used to encourage waste minimisation as we are now not collecting any additional waste that is left by your bin (known as side waste). Residents are also being asked to ensure that their lids go completely down on their refuse bins and not to place green waste, building or DIY waste or waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) in the bin.

Thank you - for putting your bin at the edge of your property on collection day.

Thank you – for putting your bin at the edge of your property on collection day.

As well the above, all residents are also being asked to bring their bins (refuse and recycling) to the inside edge or boundary of their property on collection day by 6am. Crews have been instructed to only collect those bins that are at the boundary and those that are not placed there will not be collected. The only exception to this is if you are entitled to an assisted collection, in which case our crews will collect and return your bins to where you keep them.

The Service Standards have been bedded in in most of the borough now and there are just a few more rounds to go now before the entire borough is completed. When the borough is fully rolled out, our crews will adopt the rule that if your bins are not out on the day of collection, then we will assume that you do not want a collection or are on holiday. There are many people in the borough that are happy with this arrangement as a lot of people don’t need a collection every week.

If bins are out at the inside edge or boundary of your property, our crews will empty them and return them to the outside edge where you as a resident are expected to bring them in off the street until your next collection the following week. We are also encouraging residents to number their bins as well to prevent bin theft and to make it easier for our crews to identify where the bins came from.

 

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